Weather effects freshly milled grains

In my house, winter is usually my best time to bake my best yeast breads. I dont know if its the fire in the fireplace, the overly toasty house or just the dry heat from the heaters, but the loaf crowns best of all during that season of the year!
Look at some of our whole grain training videos for more information.

Here are some tips to different weather conditions that can effect your baking with whole grains:

  • When its humid or rainy outside, the moisture can get trapped more easily in the wheat or grain that has just been cracked by milling. Because it has been encased in its hull from first formation, it is now more susceptible to absorbing moisturethan dead flour that has sat on a shelf for months. So you may need to slightly adjust the water amount in your recipe or add more gluten to the mix to get the bread to rise. I personally avoid bread on rainy days and focus on tortillas and other flat or quick breads.
  • We tend to run the air conditioner when it is hot and dry outside and that too can effect the rise time. The air inside the house is cooler than the yeast needs to raise a loaf of whole grain bread. To fix this you can either place your loaf in an oven that has been turned on to 200 degrees F for one (1) minute only - and then turned OFF before placing the loaf. The other option is to tentit with a cloth over four inverted drinking glasses on top of a warm appliance (water heater, refrigerator). Just be sure there is no air conditioner vent blowing on top of that towel. One other choice is to place it on your stove top while the oven below pre-heats to bake it. One word of caution though is to place a Pyrex dish inverted belowthe bread pan as a buffer for the heat or the bottom will heat too fast and then tent it as mentioned before.
  • After learning to predict my baking by the weather outside, Ive baked fewer bricks and doorstops and been able to keep a consistent loaf of bread no matter the climate.

    Tags: